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Roofing Codes in Different States


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Roofing codes are a set of guidelines and regulations that dictate the design and construction of roofs on buildings. They are typically set by local authorities. These codes are put in place to ensure the safety and stability of roofs, as well as to protect the occupants of a building from potential hazards.


One of the main reasons for the existence of roofing codes is to ensure that roofs are able to withstand the forces of nature, such as high winds, heavy snow, and other extreme weather events. In order to do this, roofs must be built to certain specifications, such as having a minimum slope, or pitch, to allow for proper drainage. Additionally, roofing materials must be able to withstand the specific weather conditions of the area in which the building is located.


In addition to these general requirements, there are also specific roofing codes that apply to different types of buildings. For example, codes for residential roofs may differ from those for commercial or industrial roofs. In some cases, certain types of buildings, such as schools and hospitals, may be subject to additional roofing requirements.


Enforcing roofing codes is typically the responsibility of local building departments, which have the authority to inspect roofs and ensure that they comply with the relevant codes. If a roof is found to be non-compliant, the building owner may be required to make necessary repairs or improvements.


Overall, roofing codes play a critical role in ensuring the safety and stability of roofs on buildings. By following these codes, builders and building owners can help to prevent potential hazards and ensure that their roofs are able to withstand the forces of nature.


A magnifying glass takes a closer look at the roof of a cartoon house with a blue front door to check out the slope of the roof

Roof Slope

Roof slope codes refer to the regulations that dictate the minimum slope or angle at which a roof must be built in a particular area. These codes are put in place to ensure that roofs are built in a way that is safe and effective at shedding water, snow, and other precipitation.


The slope of a roof is typically measured as the number of inches it rises for every 12 inches it runs horizontally. For example, a roof with a slope of 4:12 would rise 4 inches for every 12 inches of horizontal run. This is often expressed as a ratio, such as "4 in 12" or simply "4:12."


Roof slope codes vary depending on the location and type of building. In general, steeper roofs are better at shedding precipitation, but they are also more difficult and expensive to build. For this reason, most roof slope codes specify a minimum slope that is sufficient for shedding water, but not so steep as to be impractical.


In addition to the minimum slope requirements, roof slope codes may also specify other requirements related to the materials used on the roof and the methods used to construct it. For example, roof slope codes may require that roofing materials be rated for a certain minimum slope, or that certain construction techniques be used to ensure the roof is properly sealed and waterproof.


Overall, roof slope codes are an important part of building codes, as they help ensure that roofs are built in a safe and effective manner. By following these codes, builders and homeowners can help protect their buildings from water damage and other issues related to inadequate roof slope.


Matching Laws

In general, roof shingle matching laws are regulations that dictate the types of roofing materials that can be used on a particular building. These laws may specify the color, style, and materials of the roofing shingles that can be used, and may require that they match the existing roof or the surrounding buildings in some way.


The specific requirements of roof shingle matching laws can vary depending on the location and type of building. In some cases, these laws may be put in place to ensure that the roofing materials used on a building are compatible with the local climate and weather conditions. In other cases, they may be intended to preserve the visual character of a particular area or neighborhood.


Regardless of the specific requirements, the purpose of roof shingle matching laws is to help ensure that the roofs on buildings are safe, effective, and aesthetically pleasing. By following these laws, builders and homeowners can help protect their buildings from water damage and other issues, and can also help maintain the overall appearance of the area.


A brightly colored neighborhood is seen from above to showcase the varying colors and types of roof that are available

Weather Specific Codes

Weather-specific roofing codes refer to the regulations that dictate the types of roofing materials and construction methods that must be used in a particular area, based on the local climate and weather conditions. These codes are put in place to ensure that roofs are built in a way that is effective at protecting buildings from the effects of extreme weather, such as heavy rain, snow, and strong winds.


The requirements of weather-specific building codes can vary depending on the location and type of building. In general, these codes may specify the minimum slope or angle at which a roof must be built, as well as the types of materials that can be used on the roof. For example, in areas with heavy snowfall, roofing codes may require that roofs be built with a steep slope and that they be constructed using materials that are rated for heavy snow loads.


In addition to the minimum requirements, weather-specific roofing codes may also specify other requirements related to the materials used on the roof and the methods used to construct it. For example, roofing codes in areas with strong winds may require that roofing materials be rated for high wind speeds, or that certain construction techniques be used to ensure the roof is properly sealed and secure.


Overall, weather-specific roofing codes are an important part of building codes, as they help ensure that roofs are built in a way that is safe and effective for the local climate and weather conditions. By following these codes, builders and homeowners can help protect their buildings from water damage and other issues related to extreme weather.


Ohio

In Ohio, roofs have to be pitched at least 2:12 to get asphalt shingles installed, according to UpCodes in 905.2.2. Anything lower will be considered a low slope roof and will require either rolled out roofing or EPDM.


Ohio asphalt shingles must also pass a test to be resistant to basic wind speeds.


Ohio law states that if a part of the roof is replaced and is not comparable to the original shingles around it, then the insurance has to pay to replace enough of the surrounding materials to ensure a comparable appearance. This is helpful to Ohio homeowners who have older or discontinued shingles. This is stated in section (I)(1)(b) of the code.


Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania roofs also have to be 2:12 in slope to be able to have asphalt shingles installed, as seen in section R905.2.2. Additionally, metal roofing cannot be installed on roofs with a slope lower than 3:12, in accordance with rule R905.4.2.


Pennsylvania asphalt shingles must also be tested to withstand maximum basic wind speeds. This is stated in section R905.2.4.1.


Pennsylvania is one of the states that does not have regulations or laws surrounding matching shingles. Instead, Pennsylvania, according to David Pope Insurance, will cite precedents to figure out how to proceed and what constitutes a uniform appearance.


Texas

In Texas, asphalt shingles can only be used on roofs that are sloped at least 2:12, as stated in section R905.2.2. Since Texas sees more sunshine than the southern states, it also has section R905.3.2 for clay and concrete roofing. Roof slope must be at least 2.5:12 to have clay or concrete roofing installed. In section R905.4.2, it states that metal roofing cannot be installed on roofs with a slope lower than 3:12.


Asphalt shingles, solar shingles, and clay and concrete tiles must be tested to withstand basic wind speeds.


Like in Pennsylvania, Texas doesn't have specific rules and regulations on roof matching. Instead, it’ll be dependent on the insurance policy and precedents.


Professional Roofers

It is important for homeowners and contractors to be aware of the various roofing laws and regulations in their area. These laws help ensure the safety and integrity of roofs, which play a vital role in protecting homes and buildings from the elements. It is always best to consult with a professional or refer to local building codes to ensure that any roofing work is carried out in compliance with these laws.


Lifetime Quality Roofing is your local roofing contractor. Our expert team can help you decipher all of your local roofing laws and regulations to ensure a safe roofing process. Call us at 614-407-7663 for a 100% free roof inspection today!

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